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Gigabyte GV-R567ZL-1GI Radeon HD 5670 Reviews

This is a short review of one of Gigabyte’s Radeon HD 5670 models. This model in particular is the GV-R567ZL-1GI*. It was purchased from newegg.com for ~$90.

Packaging and contents: The box is made of sturdy and glossy cardboard. It features a picture of cybernetic jellyfish on the front and specifications on the back. Strange artwork aside, you will find everything you need right in the box. Included is a paper manual, a CD-ROM with support and installation software and, of course, the card itself.

What makes this one stand out is that it comes standard with a Zalman VF700-AlCu** cooling device. Gigabyte uses the extra cooling capacity to overclock the DirectX11 GPU by 15MHz to 790MHz. 1GB of 1GHz (4GHz effective) Samsung GDDR5 memory is connected to the GPU via a 128-bit bus. It meets the standard for PCI-Express 2.1 but should also work with PCIe 1.0/2.0 etc. No extra power connectors are required.

The card features a blue PCB which is common for Gigabyte video cards. This has no effect on the card’s function unless its’ function is to look nice in a see-through computer case. On the back are several choices of output. There are one D-sub(VGA), one DVI and one HDMI connectors available. A nice touch is that the card came with plastic dust covers on the output ports.

Test Setup: The card was tested in a HP Pavilion P6720 desktop with an AMD Phenom II X4 840T processor, 6GB(3x2GB) of RAM, a 1TB 7,200RPM HDD and a 250W PSU running Windows 7 Home Premium x64. Note that the manufacturer recomends a 450W PSU but this figure represents a worst-case scenario. If you configure a similar system you run the risk of damaging your PSU or other components. The test system had no problems of that sort and is still happily running with the same PSU and video card.

Installation: This was very quick and easy (relatively speaking). It only required the uninstallation of the old GPU software (via Control Panel) then shutting down the PC. Once the system is off open the case, locate you PCIe-16x slot. Remove the break-out dust cover from the case slot. Slide the card right in. Plug the tower back in and reboot. Next go to amd.com and gigabyte.com to find the latest drivers and software for your new card. Easy as that!

Performance: Extensive benchmarks were not performed. However this card is, under subjective observation, roughly 10x faster at rendering than the original Radeon 4200 IGP. The 15MHz overclock of the GPU represents a mere 1.9% increase over the refference frequency so don’t expect it to blow away HD5670 cards from other manufacturers. As an example: the demo version of Crysis was smooth at 1920×1080 resolution with all settings set to medium in game and 16x aniso-filtering.

Noise and heat: This is were that Zalman cooler really shines. Even with FurMark running, the GPU temperature stayed under 70*C or 158*F. This is in contrast with high end parts which can reach temps up to and over 90*C or 194*F. Even during stress testing, the card added no noticicable noise to the computer case. In other words: it’s practically silent even under pressure.

Conclusion: The GV-R567ZL-1GI is an impressive card for it’s price, offering solid performance and quiet operation. It would be at home in an HTPC for moderate gaming/video acceleration duties. As time goes on and more OpenCL applications come out it will only get better. Seriouse gamers with expendable cash will want something with a little more kick such as an AMD Radeon HD6870 or nVidia Geforce GTX560TI.

Source: examiner.com

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